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Robert M. Almeida, Jr.

Investment Officer

Robert M. Almeida Jr. is an investment officer and institutional portfolio manager at MFS Investment Management (MFS). He serves as a member of the US Equity Growth team, participates in the research process and strategy discussions, assesses portfolio risk, customizes portfolios to client objectives and guidelines and manages daily cash flows. He also serves as a portfolio manager on an alternative strategy run by a committee of MFS portfolio managers. 

Rob joined MFS in 1999 and most recently served as an institutional portfolio manager for the Fixed Income Department from 2007 through 2009. Before joining the firm in 1999, he worked at Putnam Investments, focusing on the firm's efforts in Japan. 

Rob is a graduate of the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, and earned his Master of Science degree in Finance from the Sawyer School of Management at Suffolk University.

December 1, 2016

by Robert M. Almeida, Jr., Investment Officer

The S-curve, which shows the growth trajectory of a company creating a new product or even a new industry can be an ally or enemy for investors. Find such a company toward the front end of the S curve and you could potentially own the stock through its explosive growth period. Invest at the top of the S curve, and you've missed much of the growth.  It's at that point – when most of their growth is behind them – that many companies graduate to the larger stock indexes. Skilled active managers try to find these companies much earlier on in the curve, with an eye toward tapping greater growth potential.

by Robert M. Almeida, Jr., Investment Officer

The S-curve, which shows the growth trajectory of a company creating a new product or even a new industry can be an ally or enemy for investors. Find such a company toward the front end of the S curve and you could potentially own the stock through its explosive growth period. Invest at the top of the S curve, and you've missed much of the growth.  It's at that point – when most of their growth is behind them – that many companies graduate to the larger stock indexes. Skilled active managers try to find these companies much earlier on in the curve, with an eye toward tapping greater growth potential.